Tuesday, 9 April 2013

Which social class of Liberal Democrat are you?

The BBC’s Great British Class Survey has received a lot of attention over the past few days. Instead of the traditional three categories of upper, middle and lower class, the survey claims that there are now seven distinct social classes of British people. You can take the test here to discover which of these new classes you belong to.

To make more sense of these seven new classes, the Guardian has helpfully defined them in terms of well-known sitcom characters.

In case these new classes still don’t make sense, Liberator has helpfully devised this test for members of the Liberal Democrats to help them see where they fit in the party’s social hierarchy:

The Great Liberator Class Survey

1. First thing each morning, you like to catch up with the news. Do you:
    (a) Switch on Sky News
    (b) Grab your iPhone and look at your friends’ tweets
    (c) Listen to the Radio 4 ‘Today’ programme
    (d) Read the Financial Times while being chauffeured to your office
2. Where do you live?
    (a) In a council tower block with Lib Dem posters in the window
    (b) In a flat-share with Lib Dem posters in the window
    (c) In a suburban semi-detached with Lib Dem posters in the window
    (d) Do you mean my home in London or my place in the country?
3. How do you like to relax?
    (a) Watching Sky Sports
    (b) Tweeting
    (c) Relax? I’m too busy out campaigning
    (d) Do you mean when I’m in London or at my place in the country?
4. Nick Clegg has just announced a controversial change of policy. Do you:
    (a) Complain by phoning Radio 5 Live
    (b) Complain by sending an angry tweet
    (c) Complain by raising the issue under ‘any other business’ at your next local party executive meeting
    (d) Express quiet satisfaction by making a large donation to Nick Clegg’s office
5. Your local party intends to submit a motion about wind farms to party conference. Do you:
    (a) Worry that this policy would increase your fuel bills
    (b) Worry that the motion doesn’t mention LGBT rights
    (c) Worry that you haven’t got round to installing a windmill on your garden shed
    (d) Worry that wind farms will spoil the view from your place in the country
6. You are about to go out canvassing but it can be hard on your feet. Do you wear:
    (a) Trainers
    (b) Whatever
    (c) Sandals
    (d) The green wellies you keep in the back of the Range Rover
7. Your local Focus team has been out delivering on a hot summer’s day. To keep them refreshed, do you stock up with:
    (a) Tennent’s Extra
    (b) J2O
    (c) A polypin of real ale
    (d) Cheap Spanish fizz (you wouldn’t want to waste the proper champagne on your local Focus team)
8. At the end of a hard day’s campaigning, do you and your local Focus team:
    (a) Get a takeaway from the local kebab shop
    (b) Go to an organic vegetarian café and spend all your time tweeting each other
    (c) Dine at an Indian restaurant owned by one of your supporters (where everyone will eat the same things they always order)
    (d) Tuck in to the Waitrose hamper that Ocadio delivered earlier in the day


Based on your answers, Liberator’s dedicated team of social scientists has analysed which class of party member you belong to:
    Mostly (a) – Working class political activist. Are you sure you still exist?
    Mostly (b) – Like, whatever
    Mostly (c) – Typical bloody Liberal
    Mostly (d) – How much did you say a peerage costs?

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